How to Store Blackberries

Blackberries in a container.

Summer brings a plethora of berries — it’s a fact. So does the berry stress, which includes learning how to properly wash blackberries and storing them.

Of course, there’s no better way to satisfy your summer thirst than by grabbing some of those delectable berries from the market. Fresh raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, strawberries, and any other berry you can think of are always luscious and delicious.

Let’s speak about blackberries now, shall we? Blackberries, like all other berries, are a delicate kind that must be handled with caution. We’re all familiar with blackberries as delicate, luscious fruits that don’t need to be washed vigorously because intense washing and cleaning would crush them.

Moreover, blackberries will go bad if you don’t store them properly. We have discussed some methods for storing blackberries that you can use to preserve this delicate fruit.

Storing Blackberries the Right Way

· Store Blackberries in the Fridge

If you plan to keep them in the fridge for a few days, a larger container is recommended. This allows them to keep their freshness for a longer time.

You can transfer the rest of the items to a larger container for storage after removing any individual pieces that are moldy or starting to show signs of decomposition.

Lay a layer of paper towels inside a large closed plastic or glass container, and gently place all of the fruit within.

Make sure the container you purchase is the right size for the amount of berries you’ll be storing.

The berries should be able to breathe. They can touch, but they shouldn’t be forced against one other or packed too high on top of each other in the container. Another driver of rapid spoiling is confined cramped storage.

Because blackberries are so delicate, you’ll want to store them with care and lots of room.

Place the lid on top and put them in the refrigerator once you’ve moved them to the container. But where exactly should you put the blackberries in the fridge?

Avoid Areas that are too Cold

You don’t need to keep your berries in the produce drawer because we’ve already perfected the storage vessel.

You can store them in the drawers to make room for other chilled products on the shelf, but it isn’t required.

If you want to spare drawer room for other fruits and vegetables, you can keep your berry containers on any of your refrigerator’s shelves, except for the top one. The reason is that the top shelf is the coldest, and since blackberries are so delicate, they may partially freeze if they are kept in the coldest area.

Also, remember that the rear of the refrigerator is colder than the front, so consider this when storing blackberries!

· Store Blackberries in the Freezer

When berries are in season in the spring and summer, they are most flavorful and nutritious. And, because you can typically buy them at a fantastic price during these months, stocking up on them is a wise shopping plan!

If you want to get the most out of your delicious seasonal food, learning how to keep it in the freezer is the easiest way to do so. That way, you can create all of your favorite blackberry recipes all winter long for a fraction of the price of frozen berries at the supermarket.

Here’s how to store blackberries in the freezer:

  • Wash all of the fruit with cold water after checking it at home. Remove any stems or leaves.
  • Place the blackberries on a parchment-lined baking sheet, spacing them apart so that none of them contact. If necessary, use multiple sheet pans or work in batches. This is a must-do for freezer storage! If you freeze the berries together, they will clump together and become impossible to separate.
  • Cover the baking sheet with plastic wrap and place it in the freezer for 1 hour, or until the pieces are totally frozen. Transfer them to a big freezer-safe storage bag or container and keep them there until ready to use.

You can use frozen berries in recipes or thaw them in the refrigerator for a couple of hours.

Interesting Information about Preserving Blackberries

Producing blackberries is more expensive than many other crops. It’s because the delicate fruit is readily damaged in stormy weather. Strong winds, rain, and hail can crush the fruit, rendering it mushy and inedible.

After you’ve collected your blackberries, make sure to carefully handle, cool, and store them so you don’t lose any more than you have to. Here is some vital advice about cooling and storing blackberries so that they are ready to eat.

Respiration

Blackberries, like many other fruits and vegetables, breathe, which means they take in oxygen and expel carbon dioxide. Make sure your blackberries are stored in well-ventilated crates or containers.

Carbon dioxide will build up around the blackberries if there isn’t enough ventilation, causing them to deteriorate. Cooling is also crucial for respiration. The slower your fruit respires, the colder it gets, allowing it to live much longer.

Temperature

Blackberries must be kept at the proper temperature. They will soften and rot if they are kept too warm or too cold after harvesting. Blackberries should be kept at a constant temperature of 31-32°F.

Relative Humidity

For preserving blackberries, relative humidity of 90-95 percent is ideal. They lose moisture if there isn’t enough humidity. Your lush, juicy blackberries will turn into little, shriveled black rocks as the moisture evaporates.

Shelf Life

Blackberries have the lowest shelf life of any fruit. They can be stored for up to two days before spoiling. There are, however, a few things you may do to extend the shelf life by a few days. Cooling the blackberries fast is essential for extending their shelf life.

Final Thoughts

Blackberries are fragile and will go bad within a day if you fail to store them. This is why we suggest you follow the methods listed above to preserve the blackberries so that you can use them later in a delicious smoothie or fruit pie.

See more:
Best Nuts to Pair With Blackberries
Blackberries and Rhubarb – Do they go together?
What Herbs and Spices Go With Blackberries
Blackberries and Raspberries – Do they go together?
Ways and Tips To Clean And Wash Blackberries Properly

Similar Posts